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Best Practices

  • Carbon Brush Wear in DC Motors and Generators Caused by Silicone

    by Terry Taylor

    It is known that the presence of silicone will cause very rapid wear of carbon brushes. The wear rate can be many times greater than the rate of wear would be if no silicone present. The concentration of silicone necessary to cause this rapid wear is extremely small…perhaps even less than 1ppm.

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  • Did you Review Your Last Shutdown/Turnaround?

    by Owe Forsberg

    In best practices, a closeout review or critique meeting gathers all the information from the last event and uses it to prepare for the next event.   It is the ammunition your organization can use to either support the current Shutdown/Turnaround/Outage process as cost and safety effective or to challenge how the process is currently performed.

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  • First World Class Maintenance Organization

    by Christer Idhammar

    Since 1972 I have been bench marking maintenance organizations all over the world. In 1992 IDCON structured a very formal way to do evaluations and benchmarking of maintenance organizations. The structure includes about 285 Current Best Practices elements. Each element is evaluated and rated on a scale from one – one hundred. A guide is used to direct the audit team to assess the performance rating. The methodology is based on the right things to do and leaves it to each organization how to execute each of these elements. 

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  • Maintenance and Reliability Best Performers

    by Christer Idhammar

    In this reliability article, I will discuss my observations of what the best performing organizations do differently than other organizations. It can be said in one word. These organizations I have worked with implement, the rest do not implement. Most organizations spend more time planning what to do than actually doing it. In the best organizations, much time is spent on developing, documenting, and agreeing on what to do; but much more time is spent on implementing reliability and maintenance plans over a long time period.

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  • Novozyme Leverages Results Oriented Maintenance and Highly Motivated Staff to WIn the North American Maintenance Excellence (NAME) Award 2000

    by Michael Lippig

    Novozymes North America, Franklinton, North Carolina, a company with Scandinavian roots and management style won the coveted North American Maintenance Excellence Award (NAME) 2000. A reporter (Michael Lippig) recently paid Owe Forsberg, Maintenance Manager, Novozymes North America, a visit to see how this came about. 

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  • Optimizing your Shutdown Program in 5 steps

    by Greg Gustafson

    Manufacturing facilities know downtime is money.  Every hour you are offline for a shutdown (SD) is costly from both lost revenue and cost of the workforce employed to maintain the facility.

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  • Plan a Clear Path to Reliability Improvements

    by Torbjörn Idhammar

    The term reliability was discussed in my last column. I argued that maintenance should be responsible primarily for “equipment reliability” and work in a close partnership with operations, whose primary responsibility is “process reliability,” and engineering would control life cycle cost (LCC).

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  • Reliability and Current Best Practices - An Educational Journey

    by Ian Farrell, UPM-Kymmene, UK

    The approach to maintenance and equipment reliability must be considered in full view of the papermaking business with all parties and departments aware of the targets and goals of the individual mills and business units. In short each department, and in most cases this refers to the daily interface between Production and Maintenance must be aware of the points of focus.The concept of Best Practice is easy to describe and discuss – the more difficult part is determining your path towards reliability and maintenacne Best Practice and more importantly, sustaining standards and developing a continuous improvement culture.

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  • Reliability and Maintenance Management Current Best Practices part 1

    by Christer Idhammar

    A discussion on comparing maintenance cost with ERV

    You have been told you that your maintenance cost as a percent of estimated replacement value (ERV) is 4.6% and that this is too high. Best performers, you are told, should have maintenance cost lower than 3% of ERV. (Our database shows that the average maintenance cost as percent of ERV in the process industry is 4.2%.) So, now what do you do about this?

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  • Reliability and Maintenance Management Current Best Practices Part 2

    by Christer Idhammar

    In my June 2001 article on current best practices (CBPs), I suggested that CBPs are structured in key processes, sub-processes, and elements. Key processes could include leadership, support facilities, preventive maintenance, planning and scheduling, materials management, technical database, skills development, etc.

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  • Storeroom & Spare Parts - What good looks like

    by Angel Custodio

    Part 1 of 8

    This is the 1st of an 8 part series of articles by Angel Custodio, IDCON Senior Consultant, focused around best practices in Reliability Based Spare Parts and Materials Management. 

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  • Storeroom & Spare Parts - What good looks like - part 3

    by Angel Custodio

    Part 3 Storeroom Operation

    In part 1 we covered what information we should keep (master data) and maintain. In Part 2 we went over how the parts should be organized in the storeroom. After getting these two right now it’s time to see what operations are taking place inside our storerooms. The basic operations are:

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  • Storeroom & Spare Parts - What good looks like-part 2

    by Angel Custodio

    Storeroom Organization

    Storerooms need to be organized in such a way that anybody can find any part. This involves two major areas, Physical location and a means to find a part.

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  • Storeroom & Spare Parts - What good looks like, part 4

    by Angel Custodio

    Part 4 Inventory Control –

    In the previous articles we have covered master data (Part 1), Storeroom organization (Part 2) and (Storeroom Operation (Part 3)). As we continue with this series, please notice that ALL areas are important to obtain a storeroom that will provide the parts needed at the lowest inventory cost possible with quality and low premature failure.   In this article, we are going to talk about Inventory Control.

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  • What Constitutes World-Class Reliability and Maintenance? (part 1)

    by Christer Idhammar

    I have received many calls asking, "How can you tell if an organization is a world class reliability and maintenance organization or not?"

    How well the systems and practices discussed in this column are being used indicate to me how far a plant has to go to become "world-class” maintenance and reliability. I would suggest reading this column with a group of operations and maintenance employees that includes both management and craftspeople.

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  • What Constitutes World-Class Reliability and Maintenance? (part 2)

    by Christer Idhammar

    Note: This column is a continuation of the January P&P maintenance column by Christer Idhammar. In that column, Mr. Idhammar asked readers to evaluate how well their mills had implemented the systems and practices required to become a "world-class" facility.

    In this column, I continue discussing the systems and practices that indicate to me that a mill is "world-class." To evaluate how far your mill has to go to achieve this designation, I would suggest reading this column with a group of operations and maintenance employees that includes both management and craftspeople.

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  • What Constitutes World-Class Reliability and Maintenance? (part 3)

    by Christer Idhammar

    Note: This column is a continuation of the January and February P&P maintenance columns by Christer Idhammar. In these columns, Mr. Idhammar asked readers to evaluate how well their mills had implemented the systems and practices required to become a "world-class" facility.

    In this column, I continue discussing the systems and practices that indicate to me that a mill is "world class." To evaluate how far your mill has to go to achieve this designation, I would suggest reading this column with a group of operations and maintenance employees that includes both management and craftspeople.

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  • What Constitutes World-Class Reliability and Maintenance? (part 4)

    by Christer Idhammar

    Note: This column is a continuation of the January, February, and March P&P maintenance columns by Christer Idhammar. In these columns, Mr. Idhammar asked readers to evaluate how well their mills had implemented the systems and practices required to become a "world-class" facility.

    In this column, I continue discussing the systems and practices that indicate to me that a mill is "world class." To evaluate how far your mill has to go to achieve this designation, I would suggest reading this column with a group of operations and maintenance employees that includes both management and craftspeople.

    Read More
  • What Constitutes World-Class Reliability and Maintenance? (part 5)

    by Christer Idhammar

    Note: This column is a continuation of the January, February, March  and April P&P maintenance columns by Christer Idhammar. In these columns, Mr. Idhammar asked readers to evaluate how well their mills had implemented the systems and practices required to become a "world-class" facility.

    In this column, I continue discussing the systems and practices that indicate to me that a mill is "world class.” To evaluate how far your mill has to go to achieve this designation, I would suggest reading this column with a group of operations and maintenance employees that includes both management and craftspeople.

    Read More
  • What Constitutes World-Class Reliability and Maintenance? (part 6)

    by Christer Idhammar

    Note: This column is a continuation of the January, February, March and April and May P&P maintenance columns by Christer Idhammar. In these columns, Mr. Idhammar asked readers to evaluate how well their mills had implemented the systems and practices required to become a "world-class" facility.

    In this column, I continue discussing the systems and practices that indicate to me that a mill is “world class.” To evaluate how far your mill has to go to achieve this designation, I would suggest reading this column with a group of operations and maintenance employees that includes both management and craftspeople.

    Read More
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